SPORTS

Clampitt inducted to HOF

Posted 9/2/21

By ALEX SPONSELLER Local boxing legend Jaime "Hurricane" Clampitt was recently inducted into the International Women's Boxing Hall of Fame in Las Vegas. Clampitt, who is originally from Saskatchewan, Canada, finished her professional career with a record

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SPORTS

Clampitt inducted to HOF

Posted

By ALEX SPONSELLER Local boxing legend Jaime “Hurricane” Clampitt was recently inducted into the International Women’s Boxing Hall of Fame in Las Vegas.

Clampitt, who is originally from Saskatchewan, Canada, finished her professional career with a record of 23-5. Her career spanned over 13 years and she became one of the top competitors in the sport, headlining shows and becoming a pioneer in women’s boxing.

Clampitt has spent the past two decades in Rhode Island and is currently the co-owner of On The Ropes in Warwick, where she is also a trainer. After eight years since her retirement, she made her return to action in the June CES event at Cranston Stadium.

The IWBHF inducted both the 2020 and 2021 classes in early August, and Clampitt, who was part of the 2020 group, was thrilled to be part of the experience.

“I didn’t really think of it at all. Just being retired, I kind of put it in the back of my head. I didn’t really think about it. I’m always thinking about fighting, I just came back, I didn’t really think that I was at that point in my career. It was an honor,” said Clampitt. “I am the type of person that doesn’t really get excited until it is happening. Once we got there, I saw (IWBHF founder) Sue Fox and all the buzz surrounding it, I got excited.”

While at the ceremony, the emotions began flowing for Clampitt when she and her contemporaries shared their stories of rising through the ranks of the sport, especially during an era when female boxing was unheard of.

“The most emotional part of it was listening to everyone’s stories. The girls that were getting inducted were from that time period where we were not considered athletes. People didn’t want us in the gym because we were girls,” said Clampitt. “My very first gym, I was the only girl. That group of girls, it was because of their determination and persistence, we didn’t give up. I kind of forgot where I came from and that experience helped pave the way for female boxers today.”

Clampitt began boxing in 1992 after injuries prevented her from competing in her original sport of gymnastics.

“It was love at first sight even though it was hard, people didn’t want me there. Going to the Hall of Fame, it made me look back at those experiences and the times when I had to really push through. It shows how much passion and love I have for the sport,” said Clampitt, who’s proudest professional accomplishments included headlining her first card against Mia St. John as well as finding success as a mother.

“I just love showing people my passion, boxing is more than just a sport to so many people. Now coming back with kids, it shows me that there is so much more I can learn in the sport. So much I can learn about myself. Everyone likes to win, but it’s so much more than that. It’s about motivating people. It can be done, I can show people, show my children that it can be done,” said Clampitt.

When looking at the current landscape of women’s boxing, Clampitt takes pride in knowing her place in its history and the impact she made along the way.

“I think right now it’s at its best. They’re putting women on Showtime, the Olympics, all of these girls, people want to see them. It’s about the quality of the sport. At the beginning, there were mismatches, but now it’s leveled out. There are talented fighters and people want to watch them compete,” said Clampitt. “It’s just grown so much in even the past 10 years. I hope that I made things easier for them.”

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