Rudy’s deli brings Jewish soul food back to Cranston

Pam Schiff
Posted 9/2/15

Knish, latke, kugel – not words spoken every day by many Cranston residents.

The newly opened Rudy’s New York-style deli on Dyer Avenue is hoping to change that.

With their strong roots in …

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Rudy’s deli brings Jewish soul food back to Cranston

Posted

Knish, latke, kugel – not words spoken every day by many Cranston residents.

The newly opened Rudy’s New York-style deli on Dyer Avenue is hoping to change that.

With their strong roots in Cranston, the Rudacevsky family is back for their second act. The first Cranston location was in Garden City from 1977-82, where lululemon is currently located. Another deep Cranston connection is all the major players of the deli are proud graduates of Cranston High School East.

William (Billy), who is co-owner with his daughters Audra Mena and Alisha Rudacevsky, learned the restaurant business from his father, Arnold, who opened the original Rudy’s on Broad Street in Providence and ran it from 1965-77.

Working alongside Billy and the girls is his wife and their mother, Nancy Lee, and nine other employees. Audra’s 10-year-old son Romel, a fifth-grader at Stadium Elementary School, is in line to be fourth generation Rudy’s.

They opened Rudy’s in the beginning of August, and business has boomed ever since.

“We realized that there was a need for a New York-style delicatessen in the area. We wanted to begin a new adventure, have some fun, and bring some nostalgia back to Cranston,” Alisha said. “The old Rudy’s was a lot of fun, and we figured, let’s do it again. We wanted to allow people to enjoy the homemade recipes that have been passed down to us. We cook all of Bubbie’s [grandmother’s] homemade recipes that were handed down from her mother, and we wanted to keep the traditions alive.”

Alisha and Audra both come from the business and finance worlds, and really wanted to take the next steps in their lives.

“We were ready to see what the future holds for us. Over the years, we always heard wonderful stories about our grandfather and the restaurants, so we figured it was time to do it,” Alisha said.

For 12 years, Billy had worked with his son Adam, raising money for the Rhode Island Veterans Action Center.

“After Adam passed away, Audra ‘haunted’ me about opening a restaurant. I figured I had been in business with my son, I should do the same for my daughters,” Billy said.

In 2013, they started seriously looking at real estate and getting a business plan in place.

“We looked at a place on Peck Street in Providence. It needed lots of work, and we knew it wasn’t for us. We knew we belonged back in Cranston,” Alisha said.

They are proud of the traditional Jewish delicacies they offer. From the homemade chopped liver, noodle and potato kugels, potato latkes (pancakes), matzoh ball soup and desserts to the cooked-on-premises meats, everything is made with love.

Looking toward the future, they have simple, yet specific plans and goals.

“In five to 10 years, we hope that our business is thriving and it is a place where families gather to enjoy the food and enjoy each other’s company. We hope that our patrons think of us like family and come to Rudy’s to eat, enjoy the food and have a good time,” Alisha said.

On Friday, Sept. 11 at 11 a.m., they are scheduled to have their official ribbon cutting ceremony with Mayor Allan Fung.

Rudy’s is located at 961 Dyer Ave.

Comments

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RISchadenfreude

Gotta check out Rudy's and see how they compare to Schilo's Deli in San Antonio- I love traditional delicatessens that aren't in NYC. I've always thought the term "Italian deli" was a contradiction.

Thursday, September 3, 2015